Nothing like ‘Joint Resolution’ on CBL Request -Sen Wesseh Responds to Issues on Banknotes Printing

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Despite riotous objections and political verbosities from a couple of lawmakers on attempts by the Central Bank, and by extension the Weah Government, to print new family of Liberian banknotes, positive tidings and greenlights have been emerging from the National Legislature towards the plan. There seems to be surprisingly smooth sailing of the request to print from both Houses—something that has angered some diehard opponents of the plan. In their expression of ire, some critics appear to be mixing up the processes leading to the goodwill accorded the CBL request, to the extent that some are mistaking that goodwill of lawmakers who are in favor for a hurriedly pushed joint resolution of the Legislature. Some are even suspecting the exchange of hands to get legislative approval out. A prominent Legislator with opposition leaning, River Gee Senator Conmany Wesseh, does not share the hot temperament of some of his colleagues and a section of the public and he is calling for calm and sobriety. He has been sharing his experience in what the Legislature has done so far with the CBL request, refuting claims that there was a joint resolution whatsoever. The Analyst reports.

River-Gee Senator Conmany Wesseh has commented on the speculation of the controversial joint resolution by the National Legislature to print a new family of Liberian banknotes of varying denominations amounting to 48.7 billion dollars.

“No one can legally send a “resolution” to the CBL for any kind of action because there is no “Joint Resolution” as it is being speculated, Senator Wesseh said.

The River Gee Lawmaker indicated that there is no Joint Resolution to argue about, pointing out that both houses of the National Legislature have each set up a conference committee to derive the framework that may lead to the speculated “joint resolution”.

The Senator’s comment comes on the heel of widespread speculations that the Central Bank of Liberia has been issued a joint resolution by the National Legislature to print a new family of Liberian banknotes of varying denominations amounting to 48.7 billion dollars

To the contrary of the speculation, the River-Gee County lawmaker thinks by now it should be very clear to us all that there is a whole lot about nothing.

According to him, “As at the Easter Break, there are two Resolutions: one each by the Senate and the House of Representatives,” saying that a conference Committee must be created and must meet and report to both Houses respectively only after the Houses reconvene in regular Session.

Under the circumstances, Senator Wesseh said no one can legally send a “resolution” to the CBL for any kind of action because there is no “Joint Resolution”.

For colleagues who are thinking about the courts now, Senator Wesseh said he will give unsolicited advice not to proceed yet, indicating that a conversation with him and a pro bono lawyer might suffice.

Besides, the senator suggested that the Senate for once worked across the aisle that transcends across political party lines.

Hear Senator Wesseh: “No Senator was opposed to the printing of money. The CPP was unofficially represented by me on the special ad hoc Committee to incorporate compromised views from the debate floor to constitute the Senate’s position for the Joint Resolution.

He pointed out that the CPP’s emphasis on the need for controls in the printing, shipment, delivery, issuance etc. of the money and the demand for the report on the L$4bn were fulfilled.

Senator Wesseh furthered that the Senate’s position was informed by several consultations, hearings and presentations from the Central Bank of Liberia, the Ministry of Finance and Development Planning, the Liberian Bankers Association, the Liberian Business Association, PATEL, Academic institutions especially UL’s  Business College amongst other stakeholders.

He disclosed that the CPP is not divided on the issue of printing new family of money and that his colleague Senator Jonathan Boye Charles Sogbie needed time to read the report before signing it.

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